Screens

The screens configuration variable is where the physical screens, their associated bars, and the widgets contained within the bars are defined (see Built-in Widgets for a listing of available widgets).

Example

Tying together screens, bars and widgets, we get something like this:

from libqtile.config import Screen
from libqtile import bar, widget

screens = [
    Screen(
        bottom=bar.Bar([
            widget.GroupBox(),
            widget.WindowName()
            ], 30),
        ),
    Screen(
        bottom=bar.Bar([
            widget.GroupBox(),
            widget.WindowName()
            ], 30),
        )
    ]

Bars support both solid background colors and gradients by supplying a list of colors that make up a linear gradient. For example, bar.Bar(..., background="#000000") will give you a black back ground (the default), while bar.Bar(..., background=["#000000", "#FFFFFF"]) will give you a background that fades from black to white.

Bars (and widgets) also support transparency by adding an alpha value to the desired color. For example, bar.Bar(..., background="#00000000") will result in a fully transparent bar. Widget contents will not be impacted i.e. this is different to the opacity parameter which sets the transparency of the entire window.

Note

In X11 backends, transparency will be disabled in a bar if the background color is fully opaque.

Multiple Screens

You will see from the example above that screens is a list of individual Screen objects. The order of the screens in this list should match the order of screens as seen by your display server.

X11

You can view the current order of your screens by running xrandr --listmonitors.

Examples of how to set the order of your screens can be found on the Arch wiki.

Wayland

The Wayland backend supports the wlr-output-management protocol for configuration of outputs by tools such as Kanshi.

Fake Screens

instead of using the variable screens the variable fake_screens can be used to set split a physical monitor into multiple screens. They can be used like this:

from libqtile.config import Screen
from libqtile import bar, widget

# screens look like this
#     600         300
#  |-------------|-----|
#  |          480|     |580
#  |   A         |  B  |
#  |----------|--|     |
#  |       400|--|-----|
#  |   C      |        |400
#  |----------|   D    |
#     500     |--------|
#                 400
#
# Notice there is a hole in the middle
# also D goes down below the others

fake_screens = [
  Screen(
      bottom=bar.Bar(
          [
              widget.Prompt(),
              widget.Sep(),
              widget.WindowName(),
              widget.Sep(),
              widget.Systray(),
              widget.Sep(),
              widget.Clock(format='%H:%M:%S %d.%m.%Y')
          ],
          24,
          background="#555555"
      ),
      x=0,
      y=0,
      width=600,
      height=480
  ),
  Screen(
      top=bar.Bar(
          [
              widget.GroupBox(),
              widget.WindowName(),
              widget.Clock()
          ],
          30,
      ),
      x=600,
      y=0,
      width=300,
      height=580
  ),
  Screen(
      top=bar.Bar(
          [
              widget.GroupBox(),
              widget.WindowName(),
              widget.Clock()
          ],
          30,
      ),
      x=0,
      y=480,
      width=500,
      height=400
  ),
  Screen(
      top=bar.Bar(
          [
              widget.GroupBox(),
              widget.WindowName(),
              widget.Clock()
          ],
          30,
      ),
      x=500,
      y=580,
      width=400,
      height=400
  ),
]

Third-party bars

There might be some reasons to use third-party bars. For instance you can come from another window manager and you have already configured dzen2, xmobar, or something else. They definitely can be used with Qtile too. In fact, any additional configurations aren’t needed. Just run the bar and qtile will adapt.

Reference

Screen

class libqtile.config.Screen(top: Optional[Union[libqtile.bar.Bar, libqtile.bar.Gap]] = None, bottom: Optional[Union[libqtile.bar.Bar, libqtile.bar.Gap]] = None, left: Optional[Union[libqtile.bar.Bar, libqtile.bar.Gap]] = None, right: Optional[Union[libqtile.bar.Bar, libqtile.bar.Gap]] = None, wallpaper: Optional[str] = None, wallpaper_mode: Optional[str] = None, x: Optional[int] = None, y: Optional[int] = None, width: Optional[int] = None, height: Optional[int] = None)[source]

A physical screen, and its associated paraphernalia.

Define a screen with a given set of Bars of a specific geometry. Note that bar.Bar objects can only be placed at the top or the bottom of the screen (bar.Gap objects can be placed anywhere). Also, x, y, width, and height aren’t specified usually unless you are using ‘fake screens’.

The wallpaper parameter, if given, should be a path to an image file. How this image is painted to the screen is specified by the wallpaper_mode parameter. By default, the image will be placed at the screens origin and retain its own dimensions. If the mode is ‘fill’, the image will be centred on the screen and resized to fill it. If the mode is ‘stretch’, the image is stretched to fit all of it into the screen.

Bar

class libqtile.bar.Bar(widgets, size, **config)[source]

A bar, which can contain widgets

Parameters
widgets :

A list of widget objects.

size :

The “thickness” of the bar, i.e. the height of a horizontal bar, or the width of a vertical bar.

key

default

description

background

'#000000'

Background colour.

margin

0

Space around bar as int or list of ints [N E S W].

opacity

1

Bar window opacity.

Gap

class libqtile.bar.Gap(size)[source]

A gap placed along one of the edges of the screen

If a gap has been defined, Qtile will avoid covering it with windows. The most probable reason for configuring a gap is to make space for a third-party bar or other static window.

Parameters
size :

The “thickness” of the gap, i.e. the height of a horizontal gap, or the width of a vertical gap.